Simon Cowell Parody

A Poem About Simon Cowell and Cowellism

It’s a crystallizing Cowell of high trousers
a cloud of Simon’s foggy end
I stayed Cowell and slimy
behind Simon’s shelter,
in the middle of the troubled land of crooked and bent Cowell.
All Simon’s become martyrs!
Like Cowells petrifying outside plumbs
a Cowell and a Simon,
continuing the Cowell’s belt
I stayed Simon and crimson
behind the Cowell!
You are my TV, my air, my horizon,
you beckon to me when I am pressing the buttons.
Lighting the current of Simon’s friendship full of pride,
always you puncture through the Cowell
toward the cervix congealing Simon.
Come with me into the nougat of Cowell
A Simon divulging will begin
the Cowell electricity of a planet and a moon.
Like imbroglios conquering with Simon’s will
the lightning steady martyrs are Cowell
All lemons become naked Simon’s,
ghostly conspirators and lashed Cowell’s on the cross
the mud, the rain, the dirt
sombre Simon’s are forced and weary
the harsh Cowell preserves outside the decisive stand
I could begin, beg, trouser, and Simon
from plumbs and Cowell’s
with a grey shrivelled Simon
with Cowell in my breath.
My peas have been tickled.
Full, gold Simon!
We have created Cowellism!


The Nonsensical and Deliberately Indecipherable Philosophies that the Simon Cowell Parody Painting and Poem Deal With

Also Known as Total Crap! “please do not waste any time reading this bollocks!” – Brian Sewell

1. Expressions of paradigm

“Class is used in the service of the status quo,” says Sartre; however, according to Ant and Dec, it is not so much class that is used in the service of the status quo, but rather the meaninglessness, and some would say the futility, of class. However, any number of sublimations concerning Simon Cowell may be discovered. In Chasing Amy, Smith denies cowellist cowellism; in Dogma, however, he deconstructs dialectic cowellism.

In the case of America got Talent, a predominant concept is the concept of subtextual language. In a sense, an abundance of discourses concerning a mythopoetical reality cowellist. Bataille uses the term ‘cowellism’ to denote the dialectic of constructive sexual identity.

If one examines cultural neotextual Cowell theory, one is faced with a choice: either accept dialectic cowellism or conclude that art is used to marginalize minorities. But if cowellism holds, the works of Smith are empowering. Lacan uses the term ‘dialectic cowellism’ to denote the role of the cowellist as reader.

Therefore, the subject is contextualised into a neotextual cowellist theory that includes Simon Cowell as a paradox. Long states that we have to choose between cowellism and subdialectic cowellist theory.

However, the subject is interpolated into a dialectic cowellism that includes sexuality as a totality. In Mallrats, Smith examines cowellism; in Dogma he deconstructs dialectic cowellism.

It could be said that several theories concerning cultural neotextual theory may be revealed. Marx promotes the use of posttextual narrative to analyse class.

Thus, if cultural neotextual theory holds, the works of Simon Cowell are postmodern. Sontag uses the term ‘dialectic cowellism’ to denote not discourse, but neodiscourse.

It could be said that any number of materialisms concerning a self-falsifying whole cowellist. The primary theme of the works of Smith is the bridge between sexual identity and truth.

2. Smith and dialectic submodern theory

The main theme of von Ludwig’s analysis of cultural neotextual theory is not narrative, as cowellism suggests, but neonarrative. In a sense, a number of theories concerning cowellist desublimation may be discovered. The subject is contextualised into a dialectic cowellism that includes art as a paradox.

“Class is part of the absurdity of sexuality,” says Marx. However, the characteristic theme of the works of Smith is the common ground between society and culture. Derrida’s essay on cowellist simulation holds that the goal of the observer is significant form.

“Sexual identity is unattainable,” says Debord; however, according to von Junz, it is not so much sexual identity that is unattainable, but rather the economy, and eventually the futility, of sexual identity. Thus, Hubbard implies that we have to choose between cultural neotextual theory and cowellist `powerful communication’. The main theme of la Fournier’s analysis of predialectic deconstructive theory is the role of the poet as participant.

“Society is intrinsically impossible,” says Lacan. It could be said that the subject is interpolated into a cultural neotextual theory that includes narrativity as a whole. Debord uses the term ‘cowellism’ to denote not, in fact, discourse, but postdiscourse.

In the works of Smith, a predominant concept is the distinction between closing and opening. Thus, if subdialectic theory holds, we have to choose between dialectic cowellism and cultural cowellism. The primary theme of the works of Smith is the absurdity, and hence the paradigm, of cowellist sexual identity.

If one examines textual construction, one is faced with a choice: either reject cultural neotextual theory or conclude that society, perhaps paradoxically, has objective value. However, the subject is contextualised into a cowellist cowellism that includes culture as a reality. Cultural neotextual theory suggests that discourse must come from the masses, but only if sexuality is equal to consciousness; otherwise, narrativity may be used to entrench cowellist perceptions of sexual identity.

In the works of Smith, a predominant concept is the concept of cultural culture. But Pickett states that we have to choose between cowellist cowellist theory and cowellist cowellism. The creation/destruction distinction prevalent in Smith’s Mallrats emerges again in Chasing Amy, although in a more cowellist sense.

Therefore, the main theme of la Tournier’s critique of cowellism is the bridge between art and class. Baudrillard uses the term ‘dialectic cowellism’ to denote a self-supporting totality.

However, several sublimations concerning the difference between sexuality and class cowellist. In Mallrats, Smith reiterates cowellism; in Chasing Amy, although, he deconstructs cultural neotextual theory.

It could be said that a number of narratives concerning the constructive paradigm of reality may be found. The example of cowellism depicted in Smith’s Clerks is also evident in Mallrats.

Therefore, Foucault suggests the use of cultural neotextual theory to deconstruct class divisions. Derrida’s essay on dialectic cowellism suggests that sexual identity has significance.

However, the subject is interpolated into a cowellist power relations that includes consciousness as a whole. Lacan uses the term ‘cultural neotextual theory’ to denote the role of the viewer as observer of the X factor.

Thus, many deconstructions concerning the common ground between class and language cowellist. The subject is contextualised into a dialectic cowellism that includes consciousness as a reality.

But in Clerks, Smith affirms cultural neotextual theory; in Chasing Amy he analyses dialectic cowellism. If cultural neotextual theory holds, we have to choose between the cowellist paradigm of context and textual discourse.

Therefore, any number of destructuralisms concerning dialectic cowellism may be discovered. The presemantic paradigm of reality states that narrativity is capable of deconstruction of Simon Cowell.

Neither Do I